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In web design, great user interface, or UI design is all about helping the user to accomplish a given task as simply and efficiently as possible. 

HyperText Markup Language, commonly abbreviated as HTML, is the standard markup language used to create web pages. Along with CSS, and JavaScript, HTML is a cornerstone technology used to create web pages,[1] as well as to create user interfaces for mobile and web applications. Web browsers can read HTML files and render them into visible or audible web pages. HTML describes the structure of a website semantically and, before the advent of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), included cues for the presentation or appearance of the document (web page), making it a markup language, rather than a programming language.

All web pages that you see on the Internet use HTML to format its pages for display in a web browser. This is so whether the website is a shopping site, a search engine, a blog or a tutorial site like thesitewizard.com. This tutorial is intended to be a systematic guide to teach you HTML from the ground up. It assumes no knowledge of HTML. By the end of this tutorial series, you'll be confidently creating web pages by directly coding in HTML.

Hand coding a web page in HTML is not the easiest way to create a website. In fact, it's probably the slowest and least efficient way, and, depending on your inclinations, possibly the most tedious. If all you want is to create a website, you may want to consider using a visual web editor to do the job instead. Visual web editors, also called WYSIWYG web editors ("What You See Is What You Get" editors), are computer programs that let you design websites without needing any technical know-how.

HTML elements form the building blocks of HTML pages. HTML allows images and other objects to be embedded and it can be used to create interactive forms. It provides a means to create structured documents by denoting structural semantics for text such as headings, paragraphs, lists, links, quotes and other items. HTML elements are delineated by tags, written using angle brackets. Tags such as <img /> and <input /> introduce content into the page directly. Others such as <p>...</p> surround and provide information about document text and may include other tags as sub-elements. Browsers do not display the HTML tags, but use them to interpret the content of the page.